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Two things make a post
green
annafdd
1. I convinced myself that I needed to invest a considerable sum of money on some new sunglasses, because the light in the office bothers me and my eyes are tearing up all the time. Also, these particular glasses are identical to my beloved wayfarers but unlike them they are polarised.

Well, who knew: while all sunglasses are polarised horizontally, most LCD monitors are polarised vertically. Result, I can do a pretty cool demonstration of how polarisation works by turning my glasses in front of a monitor. I can also work very comfortably, if I turn my head by 90˚.

2. Apparently there is a crowd sourced project that looks at galaxies to classify them. There emerged a group amongst them called the Peas Corp that noticed some weird small circular green blobs that turned out to be, yes, Pea Galaxies.

I suddenly and fondly thought of Douglas Adams, and how happy he would be to hear that.

(There is also a crowd sourced project for gathering data from Royal Navy ship's log. The leading scientist confessed to a great fondness for a certain Lt. Farnell, who not once, not twice, but three times got into serious trouble for having given alcohol to the crew at Christmas.)

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Someone should invent vertically-polarized sunglasses for office use. I wonder if you could persuade an optician to make them that way.

Crowd-sourced astronomy seems to be getting popular. This may be a side-effect of the way funding works; there's often money to build facilities that pump out terabytes of data, but not to pay people to analyze the output.

The only way you can do visual classification of 100 million galaxies is to crowd source it. Nobody has the resources to hire a thousand postdocs to do the classification. Yes - we do run algorithmic classifications as well, but galaxies can be sufficiently complex that these don't do so well, and they won't pick up the unexpected, like the Green Peas* or the Voorwerps. As the Galaxy Zoo webpage says:

'Computers will slowly get better at classifying galaxies, but looking at an image and asking 'what's that odd thing?' remains uniquely human.'

* So called because they lie between the red sequence and the blue cloud galaxies, in the so-called Green Valley, and because they are small are round.

a certain Lt. Farnell, who not once, not twice, but three times got into serious trouble for having given alcohol to the crew at Christmas.
Odd. Do you know when this was, please? Sailors had a daily alcohol ration until surprisingly recently....

No idea, I'm afraid. But the crowd sourced project is called adopt a ship, and they are asking participants to read meteorological data logs from British ships.

What I understand is that this incident was after the Royal Navy abolished the daily rum ration.

The rum ration was replaced (with an extra can of beer per man perr day) in 1970, so there's a reasonable chance Lt Farnell is still about....

This is the Program, btw - I think you can listen to it from abroad http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b016928z

> Apparently there is a crowd sourced project that looks at galaxies to classify them

Yep, at least one fan I know is really into this.

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